Advertising as a Vocation Frederick James Allen

ISBN: 9781230196954

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

46 pages


Description

Advertising as a Vocation  by  Frederick James Allen

Advertising as a Vocation by Frederick James Allen
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 46 pages | ISBN: 9781230196954 | 5.23 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ... printing and otherMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher.

Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ... printing and other sorts of advertising supplies, so he ought to know something about buying. He should have executive ability. He should know how to lay out work for other people and how to train other people to do a lot of work.

NEEDS BUSINESS JUDGMENT He should have good business judgment, so that he can judge various propositions as they come along. The advertising manager needs to have a grasp of the fundamentals of art work. He needs to know the arts allied to advertising, such as printing, engraving, etc.

He should know the business whose advertising he is managing. A great many advertising men think advertising is something separate in the business- a kind of department off in one corner. It is the advertising mans business to know as much about the machine being built as the man down in the factory knows. He must cooperate with all departments. Earnings in Advertising Work. Earnings in the field of publicity are substantially the same as the earnings of corresponding positions in other departments of business.

It would be entirely impossible to give more than brief estimates- yet these estimates are based upon prevailing rates of pay in representative communities and upon statements made by numerous and widely separated advertising authorities who were consulted in the preparation of this chapter. The positions involved may be divided into two groups, --those distinctly of an advertising nature and those of ordinary business routine.

The routine workers, such as the clerk, bookkeeper, stenographer, typewriter, and secretary, earn mainly from $12.00 per week to $35.00, according to length of service, personal efficiency, the magnitude of the business of a firm, or the prevailing rates of pay in a locality. The positions which are..



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